Select Page

Book Review | Moon Called, by Patricia Briggs

Book Review | Moon Called, by Patricia Briggs

This was a pretty shocking departure from my regular reads. Most of the time, I spend my reading hours with classics or popular literary fiction. I have a taste for re-reading books I love, or digging into my never-ending #bookqueue (check it out on goodreads). So when I picked this up, it was a bit of a departure. A fantasy series that includes werewolves, shape-shifters, and vampires? Not my typical #bookqueue material.

Patricia Briggs is a local novelist to the the Tri-Cities area in Washington State, and set her Mercy Thompson series in my old hood.

There’s just something very fun about reading a novel based in an area you recognize! (I had the same reflection reading The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks and my current home in Baltimore)

Now, that being said, I would still recommend this to fantasy readers who aren’t the least bit familiar with the area. Familiarity is not the only thing that makes this book good. It’s an excellent book (and series!).

I started with book one, Iron Kissed (Mercy Thompson, Book 3)

 Moon Called, which was suggested as part of my family book club – a now lapsed bi-coastal group including my mom, sister, and sister-in-law, which use to meet via Google Hangout on a monthly basis.

I devoured this book – it’s both incredibly engaging and a very quick read.

But of course, once I start something, I just go nuts. After finishing book one, I proceeded to binge-read the entire Mercy Thompson series over the course of a few months. Within a matter of months I had read the entire series. I even went backed and picked up the latest in the series, which was released after my binge ended. Clearly worth it.

Honestly, this is perfect reality-based fantasy. Briggs couples typical small-town American life with Pacific Northwest Native American myths and a bit of werewolves and vampires for added fun. Couple that with a little romance, and complicated inter-species politics, and you have a really compelling story that has a complex fantasy world, grounded in a familiar setting. Just the most enjoyable read.

Now, I will say, this isn’t the most high brow writing style. We’re in vampire/werewolf territory here. You can’t expect Nabokov or Steinbeck. Set your bar a little more in the ‘oh, this is fun, but I’m not trying to learn something here’ range, and you’ll be a satisfied reader.

So, if you’re wanting something to devour over the spring (or if you’ve been wanting a slightly more adult version of Twilight), set your sights on the Mercy Thompson series.

 

About The Author

Whitney

Whitney is the founder and one of the speediest readers behind Imaginary Book Club; delivering weekly book reviews, monthly favorites, and frequent recommended book lists with a side order of overwrought musings. After forming and joining book clubs in every city she lived in, Whitney finally decided to take the fun online to connect with fellow introverts who are also longing for a way to connect.

4 Comments

  1. Bev

    I read this book as part of our defunct family book club when it was My daughter-in-law’s turn to choose. It is far from a genre that I would usually choose to read, but isn’t that part of the reason to join a book club, to read outside of your usual pics and possibly outside of your comfort zone?

    I did enjoy the book (I didn’t really think that I would) but a lot of the reason that I enjoyed it stoned from the fact that it is set in my home own. I spent a lot of the time trying to figure out exactly where he car mechanics garage wad really located and where the werewolves lived. It was an interesting story, but, for me, I read the second book and I didn’t feel compelled to read the rest of the series. So no binge reading for me.

    Reply
  2. M

    I am always annoyed when in a blog or podcast someone (I’m looking at you NPR) sneers at “genre fiction” like it is somehow not real literature. For some reason there is a weird perception that to be considered worth reading fantasy, science fiction, mystery and other “genre” books have to be at least 50 years old, preferably 100.

    Reply
    • Whitney

      Agreed – “genre” fiction has its own merits!

      Reply
  3. Lauri

    Hey I am so delighted I found your blog, I really found
    you by mistake, while I was searching on Askjeeve for something else, Regardless I am here now and would just like to say thanks a lot for a incredible post and a all round entertaining blog
    (I also love the theme/design), I don’t have time to go through it all at the minute
    but I have book-marked it and also added your RSS
    feeds, so when I have time I will be back to read much more, Please do keep up the
    fantastic work.

    Reply

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Bookish Musings | Polyamorous Reading? | Imaginary Book Club - […] reading one book at a time. I do the same thing with series! That’s how I plowed through at…

Leave a Reply

<!-- BEGIN JS TAG - ImaginaryBookClub_300x250
<!-- BEGIN JS TAG - ImaginaryBookClub_300x600
Find me there!

Subscribe

Like what you see?

Like what you see?

Join our mailing list to get a weekly recap of all the interesting stuff going on here.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share This

Share this post with your friends!