Read With IBC | The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware

Posted By Imaginary Book Club | 24 comments


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The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware

In this tightly wound, enthralling story reminiscent of Agatha Christie’s works, Lo Blacklock, a journalist who writes for a travel magazine, has just been given the assignment of a lifetime: a week on a luxury cruise with only a handful of cabins. The sky is clear, the waters calm, and the veneered, select guests jovial as the exclusive cruise ship, the Aurora, begins her voyage in the picturesque North Sea. At first, Lo’s stay is nothing but pleasant: the cabins are plush, the dinner parties are sparkling, and the guests are elegant. But as the week wears on, frigid winds whip the deck, gray skies fall, and Lo witnesses what she can only describe as a dark and terrifying nightmare: a woman being thrown overboard. The problem? All passengers remain accounted for—and so, the ship sails on as if nothing has happened, despite Lo’s desperate attempts to convey that something (or someone) has gone terribly, terribly wrong…

With surprising twists, spine-tingling turns, and a setting that proves as uncomfortably claustrophobic as it is eerily beautiful, Ruth Ware offers up another taut and intense read in The Woman in Cabin 10—one that will leave even the most sure-footed reader restlessly uneasy long after the last page is turned.

24 Comments

  1. After last month slugging through Zero K, I cannot begin to explain how refreshing it was to read The Woman in Cabin 10! I basically sat for five hours, and read cover to cover. Such a fast, and awesome read.

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    • This book was AMAZING. Not only was it a ridiculously fast read, but it kept me guessing until the very end. And Lo was a super relatable character, unlike everyone in Zero K.

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  2. A lot of the comparisons I read said The Woman in Cabin 10 was a lot like The Girl on the Train. I think the comparison is a good one. Anyone else agree?

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    • Yep. In fact, it almost felt like the same book, other than the fact that Lo was slightly less deranged than the character from The Girl on the Train (blanking on her name!) Every time she took a drink, I was like “this is exactly what got that other woman into such a mess! Just stop making terrible decisions!”

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      • Haven’t read The Girl on the Train, but now I really want to!

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    • I thought it was better than The Girl on the Train. The characters were more relatable and. The book hooked you with the very first scary chapter. I really enjoyed this book, but I did think that a single woman living alone maybe shouldn’t read that first chapter.

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      • Fair point! Not exactly something you want to experience!!

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  3. I loved how Lo’s emails and various news reports were interjected into the novel! It made for such a dramatic reading to not know what was happening.

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    • The news reports were brilliant. It kept me super engaged with the story, and definitely upped the suspense!

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    • I agree I think knowing what they were thinking back home added to the mystery.

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  4. Did you ever doubt that Lo saw something in the water?

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    • No, I was pretty sure all along that she saw someone go in…I just wasn’t sure exactly who it was!

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    • There was a point where I doubted her, but it was for maybe 3 pages and that was it.

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  5. Was anyone else bothered by how Lo’s anxiety was handled? As someone who struggles with the same kind of thing on a daily basis, I really didn’t love seeing her anxiety referred to as “weak-ass” panic attacks. Maybe Ware was trying to describe the feelings of guilt that come along with anxiety and depression, but I don’t feel like she did anything to lessen the stigma about these issues.

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    • AGREED. It does sound like an internal monologue that is true for someone with anxiety, but man it just reinforces stigma.

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      • Right. I understand where the author was going with it, but I wish at some point Lo would have been like “You know what, self, it’s fine that I have panic attacks, I can deal with this” instead of being so self-hating about it through the entire book.

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        • I am with you. I wish she’d displayed more competence in handling her panic attacks. Although I’ve definitely been there in completing falling into one and not knowing what to do.

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    • Oh, and how they treat her about taking anxiety meds? WTF? I couldn’t believe that was supposed to be a reason that she wasn’t reliable. Like people can’t take anti-anxiety meds and understand what’s going on around them. I’d be more worried about someone with anxiety that wasn’t taking their meds…

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      • Yeah, how they dealt with her meds was really weird.

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    • I’m not sure. I think she was showing her frustration with herself and how she reacts to situations. She was trying to tell herself to put on her big girl panties and deal with things like a “normal” person. I have dealt with anxiety and my inner dialog is usually criticizing me for not being able to “woman up”.

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  6. Pretty sure through the course of the book I thought everyone was the killer at some point. That being said, the real crime and how it happened and who perpetrated it: such a twist!! This ending was perfection, and it left me really satisfied. I highly, highly recommend it!

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  7. I really liked that Lo didn’t have a perfect relationship. It made her seem very real, and I empathized with her more than I thought I would.

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  8. Loved this boook! It kept me reading until 3 am when I had to go to work the next day. I’m recommending it to everyone who will listen!

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